Security Mishap Friday: Hackable Passwords Part I

Password security is something everyone always hears about.  Make sure that you have a strong password.  Weak passwords are hackable.  What I find that is not mentioned enough is what constitutes as a strong password is constantly increasing as hackers get better.  15 years ago they recommended adding uppercases to lowercases.  10 year ago they recommended adding numbers.  5-10 years ago they also recommended adding in symbols.  The definition of a strong password keeps shifting.

This is typically not a problem if you keep up with the latest requirements/recommendations for passwords.  Additionally, humans seem to be psychologically wired to make passwords easier to remember.  This is typically by using words that have some meaning to them.

My favorite exercise is to make a sentence that means something to you.  With the sentence, you would then take the first and/or second letters of the words.  Capitalize some, replace some with numbers or symbols.

If you are not that creative and don’t want to remember the password.  You are in luck!  There are solutions for these two issues.  First, there are password generators that will create a password for you.  The two I like to use the most are LastPass Password Generator and Norton Password Generator.

The next problem comes from remembering the passwords.  It is not recommended to reuse passwords, because once they crack one then they will crack all of your accounts.  Creative companies have created an automatic solution for this.  Dashlane and Last Pass 4.0 Premium are two password vault solutions that store your passwords in an encrypted vault.  These two options are nice as they both offer a cloud solution that you can access your passwords anywhere on any device.

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Top 5 SQL Tips for Microsoft Dynamic GP

  1. Think necessity – Only look for the information you really need. The fewer rows that you pull in the quicker your query will be.
  2. Keep it simple stupid (KISS) – When you attempt to get fancy with the queries, it can have consequences. Meaning that the queries can take longer and pull unnecessary data.  Overcomplicating a query can cause unintended headaches that are avoidable.
  3. Select before a change – Select statement before you change it to a delete or update statement
  4. Measure twice, cut once when restoring a backup – Setup the restore and then go through the screens to verify that you have the correct databases, MDF and LDF selected.
  5. Always make a backup – Before you start troubleshooting an issue ALWAYS make a backup. Even if you do not anticipate making changes, make the backup.  For example, when I accidently dropped a table from the database while troubleshooting, anticipated hours of hardship were avoided by backing up the database before I started making changes.